Important School News

1 / 3

Current information in relation to the Coronavirus - Please click here to see the current information & guidance on Covid-19 and the Meopham Bulletin (updated 6th July) - Read More

Telephone : 01474 814646 :

English

KS3 English Curriculum Intent

English has a pre-eminent place in education and in society. A high-quality education in English will teach students to speak and write fluently so that they can communicate their ideas and emotions to others and through their reading and listening, others can communicate with them. Through reading students have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually. Literature, especially, plays a key role in such development. Reading also enables pupils both to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know. All the skills of language are essential to participating fully as a member of society; pupils, therefore, who do not learn to speak, read and write fluently and confidently are effectively disenfranchised.

In English, our purpose is to deliver a challenging curriculum through high quality teaching and learning. All students at the end of Key Stage 3 will have developed and learnt a variety of  skills to enable them to start the GCSE English Language and English Literature courses with confidence knowing they will be able to succeed. The curriculum is sequenced in such a way that students can use the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout Key Stage 3 successfully to work towards agreed end points. We also value the importance of Oracy and how this builds key skills for the future with students being able to become confident speakers who can speak in a variety of situations with different people.

There are three key skills which are developed throughout Key Stage 3: reading, writing, and speaking and listening. All students at the end of Key Stage 3 will have developed character by ensuring they can do the following:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

In English, it is important that we raise aspirations and achievement allowing students to access the wider world when they leave. Our main aim is for all students to be confident, resilient and independent learners through homework which is structured yet uses the concept of flipped learning so students are encouraged to develop their own ideas, thoughts and opinions.

The overarching aim for English is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment.

KS4 English Curriculum Intent

Without English, where would we be? If we cannot understand a text, how are we to answer a question? If we cannot write a letter, how are we to apply for jobs? If we cannot communicate effectively, how are we to work with people and socialise when we get older?

Students who have access to a high-quality education in English will be able to speak and write fluently allowing them to be effective and confident communicators. They will be able to express their ideas and emotions allowing them to participate fully as a member of society. Students who are confident readers develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually becoming more rounded and empathetic citizens of the future.

In English, our purpose is to deliver a challenging curriculum through high quality teaching and learning. All students at the end of Key Stage 4 will have developed and learnt a variety of  skills to enable them to achieve and exceed their expected progress in both GCSE English Language and English Literature. The curriculum is sequenced in such a way that students can use the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout Key Stage 3 successfully to work towards agreed end points at the end of Year 11.

There are three key skills which are developed throughout Key Stage 4: reading, writing, and speaking and listening which are all an integral part of the KS4 curriculum. All students at the end of Key Stage 4 will have developed character by ensuring they can do the following:

  • read and appreciate the depth and power of the English literary heritage
  • understand and critically evaluate texts
  • analyse a writer’s choice of vocabulary, form, grammatical and structural features, and evaluating their effectiveness and impact
  • write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure and information
  • drawing on new vocabulary and grammatical constructions from their reading and listening, and using these consciously in their writing and speech
  • use linguistic and literary terminology accurately and confidently in discussing reading, writing and spoken language
  • speak confidently, audibly and effectively.

In English, it is important we raise aspirations and achievement allowing students to access the wider world when they leave. Our main aim is for all students to be confident, resilient and independent citizens so they are to develop their own ideas, thoughts and opinions as adults of the world.

How will I be assessed?

1. Exam - Paper 1:  Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing - 50% (1 hour 45 minutes written paper)

  • Section A: Reading - one literature fiction text
  • Section B: Writing - descriptive or narrative writing

2. Exam - Paper 2: Writers' Viewpoints and Perspectives - 50% (1 hour 45 minutes written paper)

  • Section A: Reading - one non-fiction text and one literary non-fiction text
  • Section B: Writing - writing to present a viewpoint

Non-examination Assessment: Spoken Language

 

What is the name of the examination board?

AQA 8700

 

GCSE English Literature

In GCSE English Literature, pupils will reada wide variety of texts in which they will they will analyse and develop an appreciation for the writer’s craft. Pupils will also learn about the contextual element of the texts and will be develop their own developed, detailed and focused responses.

 

How will I be assessed?      

1. Exam  Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th-century novel - 40% (1 hour 45 minutes written paper)

  • Section A - Shakespeare
  • Section B - The 19th-century novel

 

2. Exam  Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry - 60% (2 hour 15 minutes written paper)

  • Section A - Modern texts
  • Section B - Poetry
  • Section C - Unseen poetry

 

What is the name of the examination board?

AQA 8702

 

The texts we study at GCSE are:

  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  • An Inspector Calls by JB Priestley
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  • An AQA Anthology of poems based on the themes of Power and Conflict

 

We sell revision guides for all the above texts pupils to use at home to help extend their learning.

 

KS5 English Literature Curriculum Intent

English Literature A level Specification B:

The curriculum is designed to prepare students for their examinations after the two year course. These examinations are challenging in terms of content and skill. Students will need to have knowledge of the texts on both papers and be able to apply this knowledge to examination questions.

Students will develop their skills analysing a range of texts from different time periods, and also of different forms. AQA require students to study novels, plays and poetry to broaden analysis and appreciation of each genre of writing.

Students will be taught the following texts for paper 1 Tragedy:

  • King Lear (William Shakespeare)
  • Death of a Salesman (Arthur Miller)
  • Poetry (John Keats)

Students will be taught the following texts for paper 2 Crime:

  • When Will There Be Good News? (Kate Atkinson)
  • Oliver Twist (Charles Dickens)
  • A range of poetry in the AQA anthology (Wilde, Crabbe, Browning)
  • Preparation for unseen texts from the crime genre

In addition to preparing the students for the examinations, the course will allow the students to appreciate a range of literary critical theories such as Marxist interpretations, feminist readings, eco-critical approaches or the post-colonial theory. Together with this, students will consider the structure and craft of a text through the narrative theory and also develop understanding of the literary canon, and why texts are worth of their place in the canon. Studying these theories will allow students to produce the required two coursework essays that are worth 20% of their overall grade. Students will be given the chance to choose both a novel and a poetry collection that interests them, and study these through the lens of different theories independently.

To fully prepare students for the examinations and coursework requirements, students will have access to, and show application of, the mark scheme and assessment objectives from AQA to familiarise themselves with the wording that AQA use. In turn, teachers will use this dialogue in their feedback for the students, both verbally and in written form.

As well as preparing students for the examination and coursework, this course will allow students to gain vital skills that they can use across their A level subjects and in their future qualifications. Students will be encouraged to develop their own writing style, making a transition between their writing for GCSE and A level. They will be encouraged to employ a more critical eye to analysis to become more perceptive, and they will be taught the valuable skills of approaching an extended writing piece.

In terms of character, the course aims to develop a love for reading of a range of literature. Students are encouraged to read beyond the curriculum requirements to develop this interest further, with suggested reading lists given at the start of the course. Students also look in detail at the literary heritage of the books studied; meaning their understanding of the way literature is shaped by events in history strengthens. Moreover, Students participate in discussions and debates meaning their oracy skills will develop, and they will be competent speakers for their future endeavours. Together with trips such as theatre trips and English in Action conferences, the course aims to develop students’ passion of English Literature both in the classroom and beyond.

GCE Advanced Level English Literature

This course is a two year course in which students will study texts from two genres; tragedy and crime. Within the tragedy unit, all students will study two plays (including a play by Shakespeare) and a poetry unit exploring how tragedy is presented. Students will explore the contextual and historical perspectives behind the texts as well as develop a love and appreciation of the writer’s craft.

Within the crime unit, students are taught how to focus and develop their ideas around the theme of crime. Students will read a prose text, a play and a selection of poems. This unit also involves students responding to an unseen piece of text related to the theme of crime within the examination.

This course also has a Non-Examination Assessment element (coursework) in which pupils will write two responses totalling 2500-3000 words focusing on two critical perspectives from a Critical Perspective anthology provided by the examination board.

How will I be assessed?

There are two examination each worth 40% each; one on the theme of tragedy and the other on the theme of crime.

There is also a Non-Assessment Examination unit (coursework) worth 20%.

What is the name of the examination board?

AQA – Specification B

 

The texts students study for the Advanced Level examinations are:

King Lear by William Shakespeare

The Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller

A selection of poems by John Keats

When Will There Be Good News? by Kate Atkinson

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

A selection of crime poems by a variety of poets

 

The texts students study for the Non-Examination Assessment are chosen by the students with guidance from their teachers.

 

Useful links

 

http://www.youtube.co.uk -Students follow Mr Bruff videos and videos linked to the AQA English Literature texts: An Inspector Calls, Macbeth, Poetry (Power and Conflict) and A Christmas Carol.

http://www.sparknotes.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize